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Photo of Ceratium divaricatum, credit to Bruce Foote, Feiro Marine Life Center Photo of red tide caused by Ceratium divaricatum, credit to Bruce Foote, Feiro Marine Life Center

Photo credit: Bruce Foote, Feiro Marine Life Center

Phytoplankton of the month — October 2019

Ceratium divaricatum

Ceratium divaricatum are large cells that are more or less symmetrical. It has a slightly skewed stubby apical horn and thick thecal plates. They can be misidentified as C. balechii. C. divaricatum's horns are shorter. Blooms sometime occur alongside with Ceratium furca and Prorocentrum micans blooms and can appear as a red discoloration in the water. These cells can be found in the Neritic zone and off of Washington and British Columbia.

For more information see: A Taxonomic Guide to Some Common Marine Phytoplankton, page 137, by Rita Horner (Biopress Ltd. 2002)

SoundToxins, a diverse partnership of Washington state shellfish and finfish growers, environmental learning centers, Native tribes, and Puget Sound volunteers, is a monitoring program designed to provide early warning of harmful algal bloom events in order to minimize both human health risks and economic losses to Puget Sound fisheries.

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